Pollinator Plant Sale
Going on Now!

Plants will be on sale at Butterfly Pavilion while supplies last.
Purchase at the Gift Shop or pre-order for pickup  by calling 720.974.1876 or emailing djalaly@butterflies.org today!

When you plant these plants, you’re helping pollinators. These native flowers are also suited to Colorado weather and soil, bringing dependable color to your landscape throughout the growing season.
This perennial native grows to 12 to 18 inches tall and has bright orange flowers in the summer. This plant provides food for monarch butterfly caterpillars, but many pollinators visit it for nectar. It looks great next to yellow or purple flowers, or planted with bronze fennel.

Swamp milkweed is another well-behaved native milkweed which grows between 18 and 24 inches tall and has pink or white blooms in the summer. This plant provides food for monarch butterfly caterpillars, but many pollinators visit it for nectar. It looks especially nice with purple flowers or with native grasses.

This native wildflower is resilient and drought tolerant, sporting numerous blossoms with drooping yellow or maroon petals around a tall center disk. The plant reaches between 12 and 18 inches tall and may bloom from June through October.
Purple daisy-like flowers appear on this plant in late summer and fall. Not only do the flowers support butterflies and native bees, but the leaves may feed painted lady butterfly caterpillars. The plant reaches between 18 and 24 inches tall.
Erect stalks up to 4 ft tall have oval, fragrant leaves and lavender – light pink flowers. This native wildflower is a superb choice for the low-maintenance, informal, wild garden. Attracts hummingbirds, butterflies and bumblebees.
This daisy-shaped flower has gold petals with a reddish-gold center. The plant may reach between 12” and 18” inches in height and width and blooms from July – October.

Purple spikes of tubular flowers enliven the spring garden and attract bumblebees. This hardy perennial will grow to be about 24 inches high and 36 inches wide.

You can protect pollinators!

Limit or don’t use pesticides, plant flowers that provide nectar and pollen and extend the blooming season by deadheading old flowers to produce new flowers. You can provide trees, shrubs and ground-covers for shelter, learn more about pollinators, and more!